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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 119 (some duplicates have been removed)
in advance, will be three on the economy and one each on health care, the role of government and governing, with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics and choices. both candidates will also have two-minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall is promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, boos, hisses, among other noisy, distracting things, so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now, though, as we welcome president obama... and governor romney. [cheers and applause] >> reporter: gentlemen, welcome to you both. let's start with the economy. segment one. and let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs. each of you have two minutes to start. a coin toss has determined, mr. president, gufirst. >> thank you very much, jim, for this opportunity. i want to thank governor romney and the university of denver for your hospitality. there are a lot of points i want to make tonight, but the most important one is that 20 years ago, i became t
care for our own poor in more effective ways than having the federal government tell us how to care for our poor." one of the magnificent things about this country is the idea that states are the laboratories of democracy. do not let the government telling states what kind of training and medicare they have to have. if the state gets in trouble, we can step in to help them. the right approach is one that relies on the brilliance of our people and states, not the federal government. >> we are still on the economy but another part of it. this is segment 3, the economy -- entitlements. the first question goes to you, mr. president. do you see a major difference between the two of you on it? -- on social security? >> we have a somewhat similar position. it is socially sound. it will have to be tweaked. the basic structure is sound. i want to talk about the values behind social security and medicare. medicare is the big driver of our deficit. my grandmother helped to raise me. my grandfather died a while back. my grandmother died three days before i was elected president. she was indepen
on domessic policy, including health care, the role of governments, and the number one issue on voters' minds, the economy. you can expect both candidates to have a say on the 8.1% of the unemployment rate and the national debt. keep in mind with early voting under way in 10 states already, many americans have already cast their ballots. still governor romney and presideet obama have plenty of opportunity to hurt or help their campaign in the next nine minutes. no cheering, no. now, the moderator, jim lehrer of pbs. >> good evening from maaness arena at the university of denver in denver colorado. i am jim lehrer of pbs news hour, and i welcome the new to the first of the 2012 presidential debates between president obama, the democratic nominee, and former massachusetts governor, mitt romney, the republican nominee. this debate and the next three, two presidential, one ice- presidential, are sponsored by the commission of presidential debates. tonight's nine minutes will be about he domestic feature and will follow a format designed by the commission. there will be six roughly 15 minute seg
each on health care, the role of government and the governing with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both candidates also have to- minute closing statements. there is a noise exception right now as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [applause] revi >> welcome to you both. let's start with the economy, a segment one. let's start with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs? you have two minutes to start. mr. president, you will go first. >> i want to thank the university of denver for your hospitality. 20 years ago, i became the luckiest man on earth because michelle obama agreed to marry me. so i just want to wish, sweetie, you have the anniversary and let you know that a year from now we will not be celebrating it in front of 40 million people. [laughter] four years ago, we went through the worst financial crisis since the great depression. millions of jobs were lost. the auto industry was on the brink of collapse. the financial system had frozen up. because of the
will be free on the economy and one each on health care, the role of garment, and governing. there will be an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both will have two-minute closing statements. the audience has promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, or other noisy distracting things so we may concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [applause] welcome to you both. let's start with the economy. segment one. let's begin with drops. what are -- let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs? you have two minutes each to start. the coin toss has determined that mr. president goes first. >> thank you very much for this opportunity. thank you, governor romney, and the university of denver. 20 years ago i became the luckiest man on earth because michelle obama agreed to marry me. i want to wish you happy anniversary and let you know that a year from now we will not be celebrating it
or the candidates. the segments will be three on the economy and one each on health care the role of government, and governing. with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both candidates will also have two-minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall has promised to remain silent. no cheers applause boos hiss among other noisy distracting things, so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now, though as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [ cheers and applause ] >> jim. >> gentlemen, welcome to you both. let's start the economy segment 1, and let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about creating new jobs? you have two minutes -- each of you have two minutes to start. a coin toss has been determined mr. president you go first. >> obama: thank you very much for this opportunity. i want to thank governor romney and the university of colorado for your hospitality. 20 years ago i became the luckiest man on earth because michelle obama agreed t
, the role of government, and government, with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both candidates will also have two-minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall has promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, boos, hisses, among other noisy distracting things, 0 -- so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception now, though, as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [cheers and applause] [applause] >> welcome to you both. let's start the economy. let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs? >> thank you very much. i want to thank the university of denver for your hospitality. there are a lo of -- lot of points i want to make. the first point i would like to make, is 20 years ago, i became the luckyest man on earth because michelle obama married me. i just want you to know, next year we will not be celebrating it in front of 40 million people. four years ago we went through the worst financial crisis since the great depr
captioning sponsored by cbs >> i don't think government can solve all our problems but government's not the source of our problems, either. >> i have a plan. i have five steps that will get this economy going. >> i'm not fighting to create democratic jobs or republican jobs, i'm trying to create american jobs. >> i will not raise taxes on middle-income americans. >> the debates will matter to some undecided voters. >> the debates could decide the election for either one of us. >> from denver, colorado, here is scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. we're about to see the one thing we haven't seen in this long campaign for the presidency-- the candidates side by side. it's the first of three debates between the democratic incumbent-- 51-year-old barack obama-- and his republican challenger 65-year-old mitt romney. it comes 34 days before the election-- though early voting is already under way in many states. the focus tonight is domestic issues, including the economy, still struggling to recover from the great recession. polls show the race is very close nationally, but in swing st
to the failure of, for the federal government to give money to the states in this time of crisis, which president obama supported. but you know, i think you'd see independent women, as i said before, a growing block of women, not just progressives are democrats, democratic women, could you worry about the fact that their daughter, for example, might not have access to planned parenthood, which, by the way, is really about women's health, mammograms, and not just these hot-button issues of reproductive choice. so i do think the independent women voters are the canary in the coal mined in terms of the seeing a republican party that is not hospitable or open to women's health rights, and linked to that in order to control your economic destiny you need to control your health. host: michael is a political science major. >> i will begin with the article that ran on "the nation" frontpage. why have appointments gone by the wayside in this election? guest: president obama has faced obstruction but has not been as engaged with putting forward judges. by the way, the supreme court today may be years 2% of
. one is make the big picture. he's the free enterpriser and president obama is the big government planner. and those are big differences in philosophy in government. two, romney has a tax cut plan. he has a spending cut plan. he has an energy plan. he's got to make it clear. he's got to explain to people the connection between his plans and the economic recovery that we have not yet had. that's a tall order for romney. and he's going to have to fight hard for it while the, of course is attacking him. >> you said earlier i was watching kudlow and company, you said the first impression is important. he's got to swing right away. you think he'll do that? >> that's my hunch. i've seen this before. aggressive. he's got to put this sort of line in the sand. here's what i believe. and here's what he believes. and there's a big choice in this election. he is the guy who wants redistribution. i'm the guy who wants growth. he's the guy who wants government centered economy. i'm the guy for free enterprise. he's got to say that. but it's doubly hard because he's got to put meat on the bones
in our government in recent years and has continued up until now is a breakdown in the trust among our people and the -- >> don't adjust your set. this is what it was like live. hold on for just a second. this is what it was like for people watching the debate that night. [ silence ] >> the pool broadcaster from philadelphia have temporarily lost the audio. it is not a conspiracy against governor carter or president ford. they will fix it as soon as possible. >> the pool audio from philadelphia has been lost momentarily. we hope to have it back any minute. we don't know what's happened to it. >> it took 27 minutes to get that sound back. so the first time we had incumbent president face his challenger on tv in a debate in american history, it was totally novel to the country, it had never happened before, and the verdict to the extent that there was any clear winner or not, nobody really seemed to think there was a clear winner. frankly, it was almost beside the point. everybody was distracted with what went wrong, technically, 27 minutes of silence all blamed on this tiny little capac
they acquired over the course of the weekend, this company, at the behest of the u.s. government. i think they feel like, they were forced to buy this company at a time when the country's financial system was falling apart and that in essence, no good deed goes unpunished. here you are coming after them, penalizing them, suing them for something they did to try and help the financial system. that is their argument. how do you respond to that? >> i have, high regard for a lot of the folks over there but with all due respect they bought this company with a $29 billion taxpayer loan. if anything, i think the people in most of america, feel that there were two few strings put on banks bailed out by tarp and through this loan and through other benefits that were provided by federal government to the banks. they know they acquired the assets and the liabilities. we would send a terrible message if we said, oh, you know what? some people are going to get busted for material misrepresentations and fraud and some folks will gets a pa. we can't do that. we're prosecutors. this is not the only insti
two plans. and by the way, if the government can be as efficient as the private sector and offer premiums that are as low as the private sector, people will be happy to get traditional medicare, or they'll be able to get a private plan. i know my own view is, i'd rather have a private plan. i'd just as soon not having the government telling me what kind of health care i get. i'd rather having a insurance company, if i don't like them, i can get rid of them and get a different insurance company. but people like to make their own choice. and the other thing we have to do for medicare, we have to have the benefits high for those who are low-income, but for high-income people, we're going to have to lower some of the benefits. we have to make sure this plan is there for the long-term. that's the plan i put forward. and by the way, the idea came not even from paul ryan or senator wyden, but it came from bill clinton's chief of staff. this is an idea that's been around a long time. which is saying, hey, let's not see if we can get competition into the medicare world, so that people can
to be put in to a situation where you have a government determining somebody who wants to put the idea up on television can't do that. that's one of the things with the campaign finance is that it's what to nay say about democracy is the worst form of government except for the worst form of government. the campaign finance system may not look perfect. when you look at the alternative i don't know they are god either. i don't know if it's a good to have the department of justice to determine he can't run television ads. ic you should be able to do that. i think it's a first amendment right. when you move to the constitutional right it starts getting ugly. >> yeah. we don't -- even or side there's been money in elections for forever. lots of money. going back as long as with can. we can go back to george washington and the night before. there was tails of flying rum and beer and the voice rang out the day 6 election day. how to they got out of the book. there's been money and things in politics for as long as we know. i don't think either side of a necessarily thinks the money itself and ha
. it is not about israel or america. it is about their dissatisfaction with their own government. that is something the government will have a hard time making go away. melissa: walid, why do you say it is america's response and israel's response that make as difference. >> i didn't say the united states. i didn't say israel because they're locked in almost military conflict and intelligence conflict with the irrainsian. the united states as leader of free world has opportunity now. iran this may be one of the wave to come it is not final wave of course. after egypt, after tunisia after the other models in syria and libya there is possibility for the united states to encourage basically the iranian people to continue with demonstration. >> how? >> or repeat of 2009 when the administration said we don't want to meddle, have nothing to do with it. melissa: what do they do to encourage it? >> we're seeing representatives of the opposition, if the opposition organizes. second we aggrandize their message. thirdly, depend how the events take place inside iran we may take this to the international communi
calling mitt romney the winner. trickle-down government. i wonder what lou will say about that. lori: he has been wanting him to step out and drop the gloves. a lot of people saying he did that last night. we will also talk about retail sales. find out about these winners and losers. what stores are stocking up to grab your dollar as well. hope you like corduroys. melissa: not so much. elizabeth macdonald is at the rock 'n roll hall of fame in cleveland. she will be talking with mayor frank jackson. she will also be talking to joe roman. cleveland is open for business and we are there. lori: baseball fans, probably not a shock here, the boston red sox have fired their manager, bobby valentine. they had 93 losses last season. they finished dead last. melissa: it was a tough little series here in new york. lori: no surprise, but, boy, you just get one. to prove yourself. melissa: let's head to the floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole: we are looking at a market that has had up arrows. the dow jones industrials are up. it has pulled back a little bit. the truth of the matter is, we
explained the delay, in part. >> we were working with the government of libya to obtain permission for the f.b.i. team and the d.o.d. support team to travel there. we did seek overflight permission and landing of the aircraft and worked to get the appropriate visas so we have been working through all of this. >> the state department also acknowledged today that requests from officials to keep at the ready a state department airplane in the country wereryjected saying the plane was returned to iraq when the commercial flights in libya resumed. trace? >>trace: thank you, james, from washington, dc. now over to the senior fellow from the brookings institution which describes itself as a nonpartisan public and foreign policy think tank. i want to start off where james left off with the f.b.i. getting into benghazi. now we are hearing that is the only reason they were three weeks late because they were waiting for the libyan government to give them permission. do you buy that? >>guest: i don't know. i think there have been some mistakes made along the way in how we have talked about this, maybe i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 119 (some duplicates have been removed)

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